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This article pretty much sums up why the current Wonder Woman series does not appeal to me personally.

mental-radio1:

Hola! Nubia! 
Wonder Woman of the Floating Island, unmasked. Wonder Woman #204, January-February 1973.  Art by Don Heck. 

mental-radio1:

Hola! Nubia! 

Wonder Woman of the Floating Island, unmasked. Wonder Woman #204, January-February 1973.  Art by Don Heck. 

mental-radio1:

Suddenly— an astounding intruder-!
Nubia makes her first appearance; Wonder Woman #204, January-February 1973.  Art by Don Heck. 

mental-radio1:

Suddenly— an astounding intruder-!

Nubia makes her first appearance; Wonder Woman #204, January-February 1973.  Art by Don Heck. 

I hope you all kept it together for Irish stereotype day.

superdames:

Wonder Woman bests some Irish stereotypes.

It’s Wonder Woman Weekend!

—Wonder Woman #14 (1945) script by Joyce Murchison, art by H.G. Peter

Asker dasrunt Asks:
So, Superman says "I love you" to Wonder Woman in Superman/Wonder Woman #6. You can see her awesome response on DC's website. I've noticed in previous posts that you're super grossed out by the idea of pairing Wonder Woman with Superman (my wife hates it too, she gets so mad she could spit, but really likes WW/Batman in Justice League animated). I was wondering, who would you like to see Wonder Woman date?
superdames superdames Said:
No one? Honestly, my heart says no one. I’m fully on board with the idea that Diana is independent and fulfilled and just isn’t interested in romance because her life is so exciting and her mission is so important. This isn’t some self-sacrificial, Peter Parker burden-of-responsibility, “no happiness for me” bullshit, this is genuinely finding happiness in independence and fulfillment in one’s own efforts and accomplishments. Which is also different from asexuality, I think?
I love Superman, but I also love to poke fun at him. (More on that phenomenon here.) I don’t like the idea of Superman & Wonder Woman because, regardless of what might happen in the story, the public perception of Superman as a larger-than-life Mr. Perfect will always diminish the public perception of Wonder Woman, no matter what, always and everywhere. It’s the “Superman’s Girlfriend” effect.
I’ve never liked Steve Trevor as anything other than a representative of a relatively inoffensive male whom Diana nonetheless rejects anyway.
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(…which is to say, never!)

Now, my brain says I’d like to see Diana with another woman. I don’t have any specific woman in mind, it just makes sense. (I asked my partner, who said Wonder Woman and Tigra, so good luck getting that image out of your mind.)

She sort of had this thing going on with Etta Candy from the beginning:

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And then there’s the time in Wonder Woman #30 where Diana helps a new female prison warden, named Suzan, to basically reform her prison. And the two of them just casually sleep in the same bed together:

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But my loins … goddammit my loins say Aquaman. I’ve shipped it ever since I read Aquaman Annual #1 (1995, the “Year One” flashback annual) and a young, nubile Aquaman washes up on the shores of Paradise Island. He tries to “help” Diana fight off the mad demigod Triton and then tries to kiss her:

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I know Aquaman’s characterization has changed dramatically over the decades — and I’m 10,000% sure the current state of their relationship is All Very Complicated even before the New 52 — but it should surprise no one that I have a more innocent and friendly Aquaman in mind. I’m thinking of the slightly goofy, orange-shirted, smiling Silver Age Aquaman that everyone makes fun of.

See, Diana would never go for someone who is part of “Man’s World” like Superman or Batman or Steve Trevor. They’re too much a part of the culture she’s trying to change. Aquaman is an outsider from a different culture, he doesn’t have a dumb alpha dog mindset, he’s comfortable with being thought of as the lesser partner, even though he doesn’t always understand it because he also has lots of hidden strength and self-sufficiency. I like fish-out-of-water Aquaman who gets made fun of and doesn’t care. Plus he’s a royal and understands nobility.

I know this Aquaman only really exists in my mind. And I’ve got nothing against Mera. I like Mera, but I grew up during a time when Mera was either dead or a crazy villain, so she’s not in the picture here. Besides, Wonder Woman would never cheat with a married man because that would harm the other woman.

I imagine Aquaman and Wonder Woman having admiring relations together and then being Okay With It when they have to part ways and go be independent for long stretches of time, but they always check in with each other every couple months or so and help each other sort through things. It’s not a Big Deal but it is very helpful and healthy. It’s not a Commitment (like Superman needs), it’s a strong attraction with healthy respect and lots of independence.

There’s also J’onn J’onzz…

…but perhaps I’ve said too much.

Anyway, I’m going with my heart: NO ONE. I like Wonder Woman dating no one.

This is the end of this post.

superdames:

Wonder Woman schools a dictator.

—Justice League of America #40 (1965) by Gardner Fox & Mike Sekowsky

Asker Anonymous Asks:
that last panel was pretty damn fat-shame-y, and your comment is pretty easily misread (i assume) as supporting that...
superdames superdames Said:

I’ve been posting all day about post-Marston Wonder Woman and that panel goes into a pretty rich context when you look at my past several posts.

I do not support fat shaming. Nor do I support tall-skinny-shaming (there were two Wonder Women in that panel). And my comment shouldn’t be read that way. I’ve been trying to make a broader point all day about times when Wonder Woman was mistreated and humiliated by writers in the ’60s and ’70s. In my opinion it’s the writer who is trying to fat-shame there.

I hope it’s clear in the context of several other posts.

EDIT:

And, I want to add, I’m sorry for not making it clearer.

Oh nothing, just Wonder Woman juggling six people while dancing handcuffed across a sea of deadly sharks.

—Wonder Woman #156 (1965) script by Robert Kanigher, art by Ross Andru & Mike Esposito

An Amazon is always in shape!

—Wonder Woman #130 (1962) script by Robert Kanigher, art by Ross Andru & Mike Esposito

The Silver Age was not kind to Wonder Woman.

—Wonder Woman #130 (1962) script by Robert Kanigher, art by Ross Andru & Mike Esposito

…in bed.

—Wonder Woman #127 (1962) script by Robert Kanigher, art by Ross Andru & Mike Esposito

The very complicated theology of Wonder Woman.

William Moulton Marston must have been dead for a long time indeed for DC to shoehorn a vaguely Judeo-Christian monotheism into Wonder Woman. Since when does she recognize one “true” god — much less a male one?

No wonder she’s so confused by Jack Kirby’s “New Gods” here.

Throw in the fact that this is actually the Wonder Woman of Earth-2 — explicitly acknowledging the existence of a multiverse — and I don’t know what to believe anymore. Time for a Crisis of Infinite Faiths.

—Justice League of America #183 (1980) script by Gerry Conway, art by Dick Dillin & Frank McLaughlin

Aphrodite answers all prayers, but sometimes the answer is no.

—Adventure Comics #460 (1978) script by Jack C. Harris, art by Jack Abel

Wonder Woman seemed to have a lot of problems with the Justice League in the 1970s. Not only were the members bizarrely suspicious and confrontational with her, but the writers weren’t particularly welcoming either.

At one point she is allowed to re-join the League on a trial basis only. It gets so bad that the League members actually become the narrators of Wonder Woman’s own solo title, in which they discuss her trial status:

This goes on for 11 issues — nearly a full year of Wonder Woman’s solo title is narrated by JLA members debating whether she’s worthy of the League. No League member has ever been subjected to such scrutiny before or since.

Top: Justice League of America #138 (1976) cover by Ernie Chan (as Ernie Chua).

Bottom: Wonder Woman #212 (1974) cover by Bob Oksner